Home / Skincare / What Is Keratosis Pilaris (KP or Chicken Skin Bumps)? What Causes It? How To Best Treat It

What Is Keratosis Pilaris (KP or Chicken Skin Bumps)? What Causes It? How To Best Treat It

What Is Keratosis Pilaris (KP or Chicken Skin)? What Causes It? How To Best Treat It

Photo Courtesy of eHow.com

Cool, crisp weather is often a much-appreciated change from hot and humid days, but with the chillier temperatures come a slew of skincare concerns. One of the more common conditions that occur during the winter months is Keratosis Pilaris (also known as “chicken skin”). To keep you from hiding your arms in bulky sweaters this season, BeautyStat has enlisted the help of skincare expert Dr. Michael Gold for an insider’s guide to treating this harmless yet unpleasant skin condition.

What is Keratosis Pilaris (KP)?

Keratosis Pilaris, or KP, is characterized as rough, follicular patches on the skin — almost like goosebumps that never go away. KP generally settles on the outer arms leaving you with rough, skin-colored bumps similar to acne. KP is typically painless and non-threatening, but sometimes is accompanied by itchiness and redness.

What causes it?

KP is caused by a build-up of keratin, a protein that protects skin from infection. When keratin blocks the opening of the hair follicle, bumpy skin can result. Although it is difficult to pinpoint what causes the keratin to build up, KP is generally associated with genetics or other skin conditions like atopic dermatitis.

What Is Keratosis Pilaris (KP or Chicken Skin)? What Causes It? How To Best Treat It

Dr. Michael Gold

How do you treat it?

KP can be incredibly frustrating for both patients and physicians alike, since it is often difficult to treat. Most dermatologists will recommend moisturizers that contain alpha or beta hydroxy acids to help remove the follicular dead skin cells. There are even some products on the market specifically formulated for KP. On occasion, mild topical corticosteroids may be prescribed for the condition. Luckily, KP usually disappears by age thirty.

Dr. Michael Gold is a board certified dermatologist/dermatologic surgeon and is the founder of Gold Skin Care Center, Advanced Aesthetics Medi Spa, The Laser and Rejuvenation Center and Tennessee Clinical Research Center located in Nashville, Tennessee. He is the author of over 300 published scientific articles, fifteen textbook chapters and the editor of two textbooks on Photodynamic Therapy and Global PDT. www.goldskincare.com

Is Keratosis Pilaris a skin condition you suffer from? What do you do to relieve the itch and “chicken skin”? Let us know by commenting below, which will automatically be posted to our Community Forum (click here to check it out!) where you can find other beauty related discussions! Don’t forget to also submit a photo to our Photo Of The Day (click here!) feature, where a new photo will be picked daily. Your photo just might be selected, so get going!

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3 comments

  1. I used to suffer from KP. But, when I took things into my own hands I began to notice significant differences. These changes were for the better. I have smoother, clearer skin and have dedicated myself to helping others to do the same. On my facebook page, I share recipes and tips for treating KP (keratosis pilaris/chicken skin) internally.

    Christal DeLoach
    “Optimizing Your Mind Body & Spirit”
    virgohealthcoach.com
    facebook.com/virgohealthcoach

  2. This must be the pesky condition I get for about a month on the bottom of my cheeks on my face as soon as temps turn chilly. Usually it gets really red and irritated and I get those little bumps. Too bad your article didn’t say anything about HOW to treat it.

  3. Valerie,

    To learn how to treat this condition, I offer a FREE Health Assessment when you and I strategize on what foods you may be allergic to that’s causing the condition to surface. Feel free to visit my website at http://www.virgohealthcoach.com/keratosis-pilaris

    Take care!

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